Archive for the ‘compactdaq’ Category

Regulating indoor temperature seems as easy as pushing a button on your thermostat, but it involves multiple systems working together to get the job done. If you’ve ever had your air conditioning break in the middle of summer, you know how uncomfortable it can be when these systems fail. To prevent service outages and reduce energy consumption, Danfoss A/S built the world’s first test center for indoor climate products.

 

 

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Danfoss A/S designed and built a control and data acquisition system using NI CompactDAQ, CompactRIO, and LabVIEW. They used the NI CompactDAQ platform as the backbone of the system due to its flexibility and Ethernet connectivity. By creating a new LabVIEW test framework, Danfoss A/S constructed a test solution that supports new devices. The test center is capable of controlling and monitoring both energy generators (heat pumps, gas boilers) and heat emitters (radiators, floor heating) as well as controlling the simulated outdoor environment in a climate room.

 

The test center will allow Danfoss A/S to continue producing reliable energy products. A new solution for cooling or heating your home might be right around the corner.

 

>> Read the full case study.

Most plastics come from petroleum polymers that don’t decompose after time and fill up landfills all around the world. Thankfully, researchers at the University of North Texas have created biodegradable plastics that can replace their petroleum-based counterparts. These plastics are derived from natural polymers, such as cellulose and corn starch, that easily decompose in compost. The University of North Texas is continuing research about biodegradable plastics to develop a plastic that can fulfill the consumer’s initial needs, but degrade quickly once thrown away.

 



 

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By using NI LabVIEW and NI CompactDAQ, researchers built a reliable automated system that monitors and enhances biodegradation, as well as meets ASTM D5338-98 (2003) standard requirements. "We knew from the outset that our system needed to be controlled using the LabVIEW graphical programming environment because of its flexibility and rapid deployment capabilities,” said Mark Pickens, researcher with the University of North Texas. “Given the fact that we were building a complex system with many sensors, NI CompactDAQ proved to be invaluable and versatile in realizing our objectives."

 

 

 

>> Check out these “green” street lamps designed with LabVIEW.

 

While most people take cover when a tornado strikes, meteorological scientists from TWISTEX chase after them to capture ground-level data to help researchers better understand and predict atmospheric conditions.  So when it came time for TWISTEX to develop a sturdy, stand-alone instrument that could collect, store, and visualize large data sets, they turned to NI products and LabVIEW to help them out.

 

 

 

The TWISTEX team used NI CompactDAQ hardware, LabVIEW, NI DIAdem, and an NI 3110 industrial controller to obtain, process, and display the sound, temperature, air pressure, wind speed, and direction from the bottom 2 m of the tornado. Using NI products, TWISTEX created an instrument that can measure audio from inside a tornado funnel, a first for meteorological scientists everywhere.

 



 

 

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>> Watch Tim Samaras from TWISTEX talk about his passion for chasing tornados.

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Today we introduced the C Series NI 9861 CAN interface and NI 9866 LIN interface, the newest modules in the NI XNET family of products, and the first low-speed CAN and LIN modules that integrate with the entire NI CompactDAQ platform. The CAN and LIN modules can help engineers increased productivity and flexibility through project reuse for a variety of platforms.

 

You can use the new CAN and LIN modules with the same NI LabVIEW or ANSI C/C++ software code on a variety of platforms including NI CompactDAQ, CompactRIO, PXI and PCI. Both modules also support synchronization and triggering with other CompactRIO and NI CompactDAQ modules.

 

> Learn more at www.ni.com/can and www.ni.com/lin.

Last week NI hosted the 17th annual graphical system design conference in Austin, Texas. More than 3,000 engineers and scientists made it down to NIWeek and had the opportunity to network, attend technical presentations, and see NI tools in action.

 

In case you weren’t able to make it to NIWeek this year, here are some of our favorite apps from the show floor.

 

Angry Eagles


This cool app consists of an Angry Birds game recreated in LabVIEW and an actual slingshot that uses NI CompactDAQ with digital and analog I/O. Users can launch the slingshot, as they would in a regular game of Angry Birds, thereby launching a bird in the game running in LabVIEW.

 

 

 

Going to the Stars With NI LabVIEW


If you never thought you’d get to travel into space, think again. Commercial space flight is on the horizon. Star Systems Inc. made an appearance on the NIWeek expo floor with its prototype spacecraft for private space flight. The system includes a PXI controller and LabVIEW to integrate all the subsystems and test engine setup.

 

 

 

Soccer-Playing Robot


One of the objectives of RoboCup is for an entire soccer team of humanoid robots to play a team of World Cup champions and win by the year 2050. Dr. Dennis Hong and his team are getting closer and closer to meeting that goal. This year, their CHARLI-L2 humanoid robot won first place in the 2011 Adult Size RoboCup Competition. Hong brought two robots, powered by LabVIEW, to NIWeek. Not only are they adorable – they are pretty good at soccer too.

 

 

 

>> Check out more cool demos and sweet apps from NIWeek.

NI has announced new 1-slot NI CompactDAQ chassis that support wireless, USB and Ethernet buses, giving you the portability of a data logger with the performance and flexibility of modular measurements. The new chassis support all NI C Series Modules for NI CompactDAQ and can be used in conjunction with the existing 4- and 8-slot chassis.

 

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New metal enclosures make the chassis more resistant to environmental damage as compared to the previous plastic sleeves. The chassis operate in a temperature range of 0 to 55 degrees Celsius and can withstand up to 30 g shock and 3 g vibration.

 

More than 50 measurement-specific modules featuring multiple electrical and sensor connectivity options can be combined with any chassis to create customized systems. NI Signal Streaming technology delivers high-bandwidth capabilities for achieving sustained high-speed and bidirectional data streams over USB, Ethernet and wireless buses. Zero configuration networking technology simplifies initial setup, eliminating the need for IT involvement in network setup and integration.

 

Each NI CompactDAQ chassis includes NI-DAQmx software to help you log data for simple experiments or develop a complete test system in NI LabVIEW, NI LabWindows/CVI, ANSI C/C++ or Microsoft Visual Studio .NET.

 

Visit www.ni.com/compactdaq/whatsnew to learn more about the new NI CompactDAQ chassis.