Archive for the ‘control’ Category

Regulating indoor temperature seems as easy as pushing a button on your thermostat, but it involves multiple systems working together to get the job done. If you’ve ever had your air conditioning break in the middle of summer, you know how uncomfortable it can be when these systems fail. To prevent service outages and reduce energy consumption, Danfoss A/S built the world’s first test center for indoor climate products.

 

 

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Danfoss A/S designed and built a control and data acquisition system using NI CompactDAQ, CompactRIO, and LabVIEW. They used the NI CompactDAQ platform as the backbone of the system due to its flexibility and Ethernet connectivity. By creating a new LabVIEW test framework, Danfoss A/S constructed a test solution that supports new devices. The test center is capable of controlling and monitoring both energy generators (heat pumps, gas boilers) and heat emitters (radiators, floor heating) as well as controlling the simulated outdoor environment in a climate room.

 

The test center will allow Danfoss A/S to continue producing reliable energy products. A new solution for cooling or heating your home might be right around the corner.

 

>> Read the full case study.

Most plastics come from petroleum polymers that don’t decompose after time and fill up landfills all around the world. Thankfully, researchers at the University of North Texas have created biodegradable plastics that can replace their petroleum-based counterparts. These plastics are derived from natural polymers, such as cellulose and corn starch, that easily decompose in compost. The University of North Texas is continuing research about biodegradable plastics to develop a plastic that can fulfill the consumer’s initial needs, but degrade quickly once thrown away.

 



 

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By using NI LabVIEW and NI CompactDAQ, researchers built a reliable automated system that monitors and enhances biodegradation, as well as meets ASTM D5338-98 (2003) standard requirements. "We knew from the outset that our system needed to be controlled using the LabVIEW graphical programming environment because of its flexibility and rapid deployment capabilities,” said Mark Pickens, researcher with the University of North Texas. “Given the fact that we were building a complex system with many sensors, NI CompactDAQ proved to be invaluable and versatile in realizing our objectives."

 

 

 

>> Check out these “green” street lamps designed with LabVIEW.

 

Red Bull is sponsoring the Red Bull Stratos project that will take world famous base-jumper and pilot, Felix Baumgartner, 120,000 feet above earth to make the longest stratospheric free-fall jump known to man. The mission is to gather data while setting history, and for Felix to be the first human to break the speed of sound with his body.

 

 

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To keep Felix safe, and make sure that he is prepared, the Red Bull Stratos team uses LabVIEW to control and monitor everything from altitude, air pressure, temperature and more. In a preliminary training scenario recorded and published in the video below, screenshots of LabVIEW are shown measuring and monitoring the capsule and air pressure around it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This preliminary training scenario takes Felix into a pressure chamber that simulates the conditions of the jump and atmosphere. This prepares Felix and his body for the cold, vacuum like conditions of falling through the real atmosphere. When it comes to Red Bull Stratos and LabVIEW, it isn’t just about making history, it’s about protecting Felix’s life too.

 

 

>> Check out other ways LabVIEW is getting into space.

If you are still learning about control systems, the control functions showcase is a simple VI that can be a big help. Input a control function, select which data you want to view, and then the front panel will quickly display a graph and data for that particular response. 

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>>Download the code here

Getting hands-on experience in the mission control center during a space exploration experiment might put a student ahead of the competition. But what if you are the student who created the mission control software being used to monitor the entire experiment?


To win a competitive slot on the United Kingdom’s first flight of a small spacecraft, students at United Kingdom’s Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (UKSEDS) used NI LabVIEW and ANSI C to write Open Mission Control Software. They created a sophisticated framework that is advanced enough for any national space agency spacecraft, yet is flexible and easy to use. LabVIEW Run-Time Engine lets users easily add system enhancements and the open source platform extends functionality for any type of space exploration. Even those with limited experience can create sophisticated mission control software.

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Whether the need is to monitor data for spacecraft experiments or command software for a real spacecraft, the Open Mission Control system expands the capabilities of small spacecraft control. The platform can be adapted quickly and easily to support a variety of spacecraft including CubeSats, myPocketQubs, and NanoLab experiments.


As part of their mission to promote space exploration and development through educational and engineering projects, UKSEDS distributed their Open Mission Control application to thousands of schools and universities so other students could further their own developments. This not only encourages schools and universities to take part in the OpenSpace365 initiative, but it challenges them to continue pushing the boundaries of space exploration even further.

 

>>Read the full case study here.

Community macaba has a piece of code available on the community that allows you to easily send data from a running VI to a UI mockup of the VI on your iOS device. It uses a special version of the UDP protocol to send data back and forth. The direct applicaitons I see this benefiting is when you want to control a VI remotely and want to use devices that are commonly available (e.g. I want to turn off that valve from my iPhone while I travel) and also for just remote viewing as well (e.g. I just want to see what the temperature if on my applicaiton from anywhere). Go check out macaba's example and see if it could fit into your LabVIEW application!

 

Control LabVIEW from the iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch


Community member tjellden created an example program to show off the 3D Picture Control capabilities in LabVIEW. If you run the VI, then you can pull back on the joystick with your mouse and the graphic will update with the aircraft's movement. Needless to say I spent 15 minutes playing with the VI to make the plane do barrel rolls and then I dove into the code to figure out how it was done. I highly suggest checking this Flight Simulator In LabVIEW example out if you are interested in more advanced graphics in LabVIEW.

 

 

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