Archive for the ‘design’ Category

Here’s part two of our LabVIEW 2012 features list. See something you want changed? Let the community know by sharing it on the LabVIEW Idea Exchange. We have a proven track record of listening to—and acting upon—requests made from our community.

 

Enhanced Stability

NI’s research and development team has made substantial efforts to improve the stability of LabVIEW 2012. In this version, you’ll see how their hard work paid off. But stability isn’t the only focus. Improving the edit-time responsiveness of the entire LabVIEW platform was also a priority, as well as a better error reporter and higher prioritization of CARs.

 

FPGA Enhancements
LabVIEW FPGA lets designers use less engineering resources and get to market faster. Powerful new features, like faster compilation and tools for simplifying IP resuse, shorten development time and improve the performance of applications.

 

System Simulation

The LabVIEW Robotics Simulator, based on the Open Dynamics Engine, is a physics-based simulator that emulates robotics design, letting developers validate design and algorithm choices more efficiently and effectively.

 

Ecosystem Improvements

The “NI ecosystem” is another way of saying our users’ community—their access to each other and extras (like package downloads, add-ons, and instrument drivers). These all help to increase productivity, while offering a large space for certified developers to discuss and grow their ideas. Explore the network to see how it can benefit you.

 

>> See all of the new features for LabVIEW 2012.

From inspecting the packaging of consumer goods to surveilling traffic to identifying cells with fluorescence, vision techniques are increasingly being used in every industry imaginable. Whether you are using vision to improve the quality of your finished goods, guide your robot, or add traceability to improve your process, here are five considerations to keep in mind when you choose your vision system.

 

  1. Software is the key

    Ease of use is all about abstracting technology components in a system so that you can meet familiar application challenges as a domain expert. This means you can concentrate on your vision inspection while NI worries about how to make your applications work for different camera standards and take advantage of the latest hardware advancements.

    NI LabVIEW graphical programming software also provides a powerful and easy-to-learn environment (compared to text-based programming), and gives you access to hundreds of functions to enhance images, measure parts, identify objects, check for presence, and locate features through the NI Vision Development Module.

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    Through software, you can model system variations to see if your inspection will stand up to motion blur, changes in lightin, and camera      position. These common issues in vision systems can be seen in the image above.

  2. Choosing the right camera

    Each application is best suited to a certain type of image sensor, with options spanning area-scan, monochrome, and color sensors as well as specialty sensors such as thermal (infrared), 3D, and line-scan. It is important to be aware of inspection conditions when choosing among these different sensor types.  For example, inspecting quick-moving rolls of textile requires a line-scan sensor while measuring hot metal in a dusty, dark environment requires a thermal camera.

    NI has made it a priority to support the most widely used imaging standards and strives to integrate support for new technologies. With the NI Vision Acquisition Software driver package, you can use a common framework to acquire images from smart cameras; traditional plug-in frame grabbers using analog, parallel digital, and Camera Link standards; and consumer buses such as GigE Vision, USB, and IEEE 1394. These drivers are the first to natively support image acquisition from GigE Vision and IEEE 1394 cameras in real time.

  3. Intelligent vision through industrial connectivity.....


To read about numbers 3 through 5 as well as dive deeper into the first too points, check out this article on vision systems>>>

Hold on to your electric vehicle seat; energy is going digital. When a technology goes digital, it changes everything. For starters, the rate of technology improvement takes a new slope—transitioning from glacially slow to exponentially fast. Think about online search and how it changed the way we find information, how social media changed the way we receive news, and how electronic books and e-readers changed the way we buy books. When a technology goes digital, words like “library,” “newspaper,” and “bookstore” start to sound like relics of the past.

 

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When an analog technology goes digital, it becomes an information technology—a software problem. The digital energy revolution is enabled by powerful software tools, ample computing power, secure Internet backbones, specialized embedded hardware systems, and one more thing—power electronics.

 

To read more specifics on how you will be impacted by this digital revolution in energy, check out this article>>>

At the fourth annual Graphical System Design Achievement (GSDA) Awards event, held during the NIWeek 2011 conference and exhibition, National Instruments honored 17 innovative applications developed by engineers, scientists and researchers from around the world and across a variety of industries. More than 300 authors from 20 countries submitted entries to the GSDA Awards, making this year’s pool of applicants the largest and most competitive in the awards’ history.

 

Innovators from eight application categories, ranging from robotics and academic research to advanced control systems and embedded monitoring, were recognized for using NI technology and a graphical system design approach to develop solutions to critical engineering and science challenges. Following are just a few examples of the awards presented:

 

  • The 2011 Application of the Year Award was presented to Christian Sames of the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics for developing a custom time digitizer to study fundamental quantum properties of light-matter interaction.

 

  • The Green Engineering award went to Vestas Wind Systems and CIM Industrial Systems A/S for designing and testing the durability of a wind turbine drivetrain.

 

  • The Humanitarian Award was presented to Kitasato University received  for developing the world’s first real-time 3-D medical imaging system.

 

To see the full list of award recipients and learn the details of their applications, visit www.ni.com/gsdawards/explore_2011.htm.