Archive for the ‘real-time’ Category

LabVIEW user groups meet regularly to share programming techniques, application design patterns, tips and tricks to make NI LabVIEW work for you, and new LabVIEW technology, like the iOS and Android mobile apps released this week.

 

Sometimes LabVIEW user groups, like the Rocket City user group in Huntsville, AL, redesign LabVIEW to make it yummier than ever before. Nothing beats a sugar-loaded serving of graphical system design.

 



 

 

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>> Find a user group in your area (cake optional)

Today, bridge structures are tested with unique constraints. Vehicle loads and extreme conditions give researchers a better understanding of the impact these structures can withstand. However, bridges are not being designed for both of these conditions at the same time.

 

Researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno are using graphical system design to test bridge sections and the extreme conditions they may endure. To better understand the behavior of these immense structures during an earthquake and the combined load of a vehicle, researchers wanted to accurately test how the vehicles suspension system interacts with the movement of a bridge. They achieved this by building bridge sections and simulating earthquakes with large hydraulic shakers.

 

NI data acquisition hardware and the NI LabVIEW Real-Time Module helped the researchers easily program a system that could monitor critical components of their simulation such as strain, force and displacement. The ability to collect and process accurate data all with one platform made the test system a huge success. The entire system design gives researchers the capabilities to better understand the behaviors and movements of the structures we drive across every day.

 

 

>>Read the full case study here

Getting hands-on experience in the mission control center during a space exploration experiment might put a student ahead of the competition. But what if you are the student who created the mission control software being used to monitor the entire experiment?


To win a competitive slot on the United Kingdom’s first flight of a small spacecraft, students at United Kingdom’s Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (UKSEDS) used NI LabVIEW and ANSI C to write Open Mission Control Software. They created a sophisticated framework that is advanced enough for any national space agency spacecraft, yet is flexible and easy to use. LabVIEW Run-Time Engine lets users easily add system enhancements and the open source platform extends functionality for any type of space exploration. Even those with limited experience can create sophisticated mission control software.

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Whether the need is to monitor data for spacecraft experiments or command software for a real spacecraft, the Open Mission Control system expands the capabilities of small spacecraft control. The platform can be adapted quickly and easily to support a variety of spacecraft including CubeSats, myPocketQubs, and NanoLab experiments.


As part of their mission to promote space exploration and development through educational and engineering projects, UKSEDS distributed their Open Mission Control application to thousands of schools and universities so other students could further their own developments. This not only encourages schools and universities to take part in the OpenSpace365 initiative, but it challenges them to continue pushing the boundaries of space exploration even further.

 

>>Read the full case study here.

Armed with NI LabVIEW software, CompactRIO, and PXI hardware, researchers at the University of Zagreb in Croatia have established the Laboratory for Renewable Energy Sources, or LARES. We all know that green is the way to be, but as the demand for clean energy grows, the need to make it efficient and readily available does as well. To meet such demands, LARES conducts research on controlling and storing wind, hydrogen, and solar energy.

 

Let’s get the nuts and bolts straight. LARES is a microgrid consisting of a custom-made wind turbine, an electrolyzer and fuel cell stack for hydrogen production, and solar panels. It was designed to investigate and develop microgrid algorithms to control specific energy sources. Designing these control algorithms can be tricky, because the amount of energy produced by renewable sources is often unpredictable. The algorithms require many control loops and real-time hardware operation on a millisecond time scale. That’s a definite need for speed. With the help of NI products, the LARES engineers laid the foundation for virtual power plant control and made green energy a more reliable power source for the future. Captain Planet would be proud.

 

Check out their mean, green set-up:

 

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      Wind Chamber with Wind Turbine and Powerful Blower     

 

 

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                                                                            Hydrogen-Based Energy Source Consisting of Hydrogen Storage,                                                                            

Fuel Cell, Valves, and Measurement Equipment

 

 

>> Check out the full case study here.