Archive for the ‘smart’ Category

In the coming years, the Data Dashboard might not be the only way to interact with LabVIEW on a tablet.

 

 

National Instruments has set out to make portable technology like tablets and smartphones as productive as possible with an ecosystem of mobile applications and instruments. In this NIWeek 2012 keynote address, Kyle Gupton points out that LabVIEW is the most touch-ready language on the planet. Customers can already view their LabVIEW applications through the Data Dashboard for LabVIEW app, which has a new version launch coming up.

 

Watch as Jeff Kodosky, the father of LabVIEW, demonstrates a “very, very, very early version” of a touch-based interface for LabVIEW in this keynote address from NIWeek 2012. As NI engineers continue to develop interactive software solutions, users can look forward to the possibility of designing and editing LabVIEW diagrams without lifting a finger—literally.

 

>> Learn more about the upcoming version of Data Dashboard for LabVIEW.

Hold on to your electric vehicle seat; energy is going digital. When a technology goes digital, it changes everything. For starters, the rate of technology improvement takes a new slope—transitioning from glacially slow to exponentially fast. Think about online search and how it changed the way we find information, how social media changed the way we receive news, and how electronic books and e-readers changed the way we buy books. When a technology goes digital, words like “library,” “newspaper,” and “bookstore” start to sound like relics of the past.

 

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When an analog technology goes digital, it becomes an information technology—a software problem. The digital energy revolution is enabled by powerful software tools, ample computing power, secure Internet backbones, specialized embedded hardware systems, and one more thing—power electronics.

 

To read more specifics on how you will be impacted by this digital revolution in energy, check out this article>>>

A 3D display isn’t a new discovery, but its recent surge in popularity is clear, from 3D movie releases to expensive 3D TVs. Enhancing the optical illusion of depth perception is a unique process. The technique essentially happens by presenting two offset images separately to the left and right eye of the viewer. To make the offset images create depth, you then put on those funny looking glasses. Though attractive, these systems are expensive and lack interactivity.

 

The professors at Tsinghua University set out to change those deficiencies. Carrying out the task of creating a new 3D display system that was interactive and used real objects was a challenge. The process began with creating a virtual model. The team used NI LabVIEW software to read the model document and subsequently set parameters in order to project a new image. The new image was then displayed on an inverted optical structure. Once the image was displayed, they used a USB camera, NI PXI hardware, and NI Vision assistant to recognize movement and control the 3D display.

The final steps were to create a system that would actually show the 3D image. The team used a turntable controlled with PXI hardware and the NI 1764 Smart Camera. Together, these tools captured images and gathered information from all directions while the object rotated, allowing users to choose images they wanted to exhibit for the final 3D display.


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     3D display of real object


By using LabVIEW software with tools such as NI Smart Camera and Vision Assistant, professors at Tsinghua University were able to conquer their 3D challenge. They created a 3D system display that was interactive, inexpensive, and didn’t require special glasses. 

 

>>Learn more about LabVIEW and the 3D display system

NI today announced the expansion of the NI Smart Camera family with seven new models and improvements including color and high-resolution options, improved processing power and IP67 ratings.

 

The new NI 177x Smart Cameras feature a 1.6 GHz Intel® Atom™ processor, which delivers processing speeds four times greater than other NI Smart Cameras, and a real-time operating system for reliability and determinism.  The cameras offer new sensor options to deliver higher resolution image acquisition, rugged mechanical housings, M12 connectors, and dust- and water-resistant lens covers that have earned the cameras an IP67 rating. They can be programmed with LabVIEW graphical programming and the NI Vision Development Module for advanced customization and integration with other National Instruments hardware.

 

Learn more at www.ni.com/smartcamera.